EU PARLIAMENT CALLS FOR ‘REPARATIONS FOR CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY’ TO AFRO-EUROPEANS

The European Parliament overwhelmingly approved a resolution Tuesday addressing “structural racism” in Europe against Europeans of African descent. The resolution calls for “reparations for crimes against humanity during European colonialism.” The document was written by the British Labour MEP Claude Moraes and was inspired by the racist behavior allegedly experienced by Italian socialist MEP Cécile … More EU PARLIAMENT CALLS FOR ‘REPARATIONS FOR CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY’ TO AFRO-EUROPEANS

Joseph Cinquez, the Congolese’s Chief who prefers death to slavery

Amistad mutiny, (July 2, 1839), slave rebellion that took place on the slave ship Amistad near the coast of Cuba and had important political and legal repercussions in the American abolition movement. The mutineers were captured and tried in the United States, and a surprising victory for the country’s antislavery forces resulted in 1841 when the U.S. Supreme Court freed the rebels. A committee formed … More Joseph Cinquez, the Congolese’s Chief who prefers death to slavery

Kimpa Vita: The Antonian Movement, Jesus is Congolese

Kimpa Vita (circa 1685-July 2, 1706), whose baptized name was Dona Beatriz, founded a religious sect known as the Antonians. The goal of this movement was to restore the fortunes of the once glorious kingdom of Kongo and to Africanize Christianity. After October 1665, when the Portuguese had defeated the Kongo army, the capital San … More Kimpa Vita: The Antonian Movement, Jesus is Congolese

Abdel Kader Kane: Moorish Abolitionist (1770s-1800s)

Abdel Kader Kane was a Moorish leader of the Futa Toro region in Northern Senegal is renowned for having resisted the slave trade.” In the 18th century, Senegambia was bitterly contested for slave-trading purposes by France and Great Britain. But a third power, the Islamic theocracy of Futa Toro on the Senegal River, rose to … More Abdel Kader Kane: Moorish Abolitionist (1770s-1800s)

One of the toughest women ever to work in a convent: “Black Mary”

Although she may have been one of the toughest women ever to work in a convent, ‘Black Mary’ had earned the respect and devotion of most of the residents of the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana, before she died in 1914. In fact, Mary Fields was widely beloved. She was admired and respected throughout the … More One of the toughest women ever to work in a convent: “Black Mary”

Queen Nzinga – The fearsome warrior

Njinga Mbandi (also known as Nzinga and Ana Njinga) was born around 1582, the oldest daughter of Mbandi a Ngola Kiluanji, king of Ndongo (present-day central Angola). Early in her life, Njinga exhibited great physical prowess, which her father fostered by allowing her to train with the army. Displaying extraordinary charisma and physical prowess at … More Queen Nzinga – The fearsome warrior

King Amador – Resistance to the Portuguese enslavement.

Amador led a major slave revolt in 1595 on the island of São Tomé that came close to overthrowing Portuguese colonial authority. Amador’s date of birth is unknown, but he was born on São Tomé. São Tomé was uninhabited when the Portuguese arrived on the island around 1471. Beginning in 1493, Portuguese colonists established sugarcane plantations … More King Amador – Resistance to the Portuguese enslavement.

Solitude – La mulatresse solitude

Commonly remembered in Guadeloupe as “la mulâtresse Solitude” (“Solitude the Mulatto Woman”), Solitude has become a legendary figure in the antislavery struggles of Caribbean blacks in the early nineteenth century. Her extreme courage made her legendary and prompted whites to caricature her as mad. While details about Solitude’s life are few, her existence has been … More Solitude – La mulatresse solitude

Phillis Wheatley

Poet, considered a founder of African American literature, was born around 1753, probably among the Fulani peoples living near the Gambia River in West Africa. Her poetry and prose indicate familiarity with animistic ancestor worship, solar worship, Islam, and an African consciousness she brought to North America after she was captured aged 7 or 8, … More Phillis Wheatley

James Bannerman

James Bannerman was a prominent trader and slave-owner in Ghana in the first half of the nineteenth century. His parents were Colonel Henry Bannerman, a Scottish trader and officer, and a Ga woman from Accra whose name is unknown. Henry Bannerman worked for the Royal Africa Company and was stationed at Cape Coast, a British … More James Bannerman